Everyday TBRI: Scripts

Posted October 7, 2016

Everyday TBRI: Scripts

Everyday TBRI®


Scripts

Scripts are short statements we use with children to talk about values.  As parents, you might already be using scripts with your children and you don’t even know it!  Have you caught yourself saying “Can you use your big boy voice?” or “Is that the truth?” 
Scripts are great for children from hard places, since many have not learned the necessary social skills they need to navigate their worlds.  Examples of scripts from TBRI® are:
With respect
Gentle and kind
Asking or telling?
No hurts
Use your words

For those of you who were fans of Mister Rogers as children, Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood is a wonderful cartoon version with many of your favorite characters.  It’s geared towards little ones, with songs built in that align perfectly with TBRI® scripts.   When parents learn the songs in these episodes (and I promise you will whether you want to or not!), singing them to your children  when they need reminding helps cue the script, which keeps your train moving forward.  Parenting win!

Tune in each Friday for more Everyday TBRI®
What is TBRI®?

TBRI® is an attachment-based, trauma-informed intervention that is designed to meet the complex needs of vulnerable children. TBRI® uses Empowering Principles to address physical needs, Connecting Principles for attachment needs, and Correcting Principles to disarm fear-based behaviors. While the intervention is based on years of attachment, sensory processing, and neuroscience research, the heartbeat of TBRI® is connection.
TBRI® is designed for children from “hard places” such as abuse, neglect, and/or trauma. Because of their histories, it is often difficult for these children to trust the loving adults in their lives, which often results in perplexing behaviors. TBRI® offers practical tools for parents, caregivers, teachers, or anyone who works with children, to see the “whole child” in their care and help that child reach his highest potential.
Want to know more? Visit TCU’s Institute of Child Development http://child.tcu.edu/.